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Scotch Game Chess Books

Scotch Game

The Scotch is one of the classical openings every beginning chess player learns how to play. First documented in the 18th century, the Scotch still is a relatively unexplored opening. This invites the white player who just wants to 'play a game of chess' to choose the Scotch on several occasions, normally putting some annoying pressure on black. The long term strategy from white is often to weaken black's pawn structure early to profit late in the game. After 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 white plays 3.d4, immediately challenging the centre. Black normally takes with 3... exd4 and after 4. Nxd4 the starting position of the Scotch has been reached. Now 4... Nf6 and 4... Bc5 are the most common black moves, leading to different type of games. After 4... Nf6 the main move is 5. Nxc6. If white plays 5. Nc3 Bb4, the opening transposing to the Scotch Four Knights, usually an opening categorised under the Four Knight Game. Openings like the Scotch Gambit (4. Bc4), the Göring Gambit (4.c3) and the Danish Gambit (4. c3 exd3 5. Bc4) are sharp openings often to be seen on club level. There not considered pure Scotch Games, so one can normally find them in specific books (also below) or in books on Open Games in general. In the Scotch Game some sidelines exist also, like the Steinitz Variation (4... Qh4). In the Classical Variation (4... Bc5) a normal continuation is 5. Nxc6 ... Qf6 (threatening mate), and then taking the knight on c6 with the d-pawn. As one can see already there are quit a lot of theoretical lines. Having said this, these lines usually are relatively easy to remember, resulting in open games with an asymmetrical structure and dynamic chances for both sides. Most top players have played the Scotch sometime during their career. Great advocates are Garry Kasparov, Jan Timman and Hikaru Nakamura, to name just a few. Even when the Scotch is out a fashion for a while, you now it will be popular again sometime soon. Yelena Dembo, Richard Palliser and John Emms are amongst those who wrote books on this classical, but still very interesting opening.



The Scotch Gambit: An Energetic And Aggressive System For White - Alex Fishbein
2017 Russell Enterprises, Inc. The Scotch Gambit: An Energetic And Aggressive System For White-Alex Fishbein

The Scotch Gambit - sometimes referred at as the Morphy Attack - is one of those openings that are rarely seen at top level, but at the same time very popular at amateur level. Why is that the case? Well, to put it simply: the Scotch Gambit is a very tricky opening to meet with black. After 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4 the black player has to know some rather long lines of theory and if you're not precise, it's not uncommon to lose before move 25.
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Scotch Game (everyman Chess) - Yelena Dembo, Richard Palliser
0000 Everyman Chess Scotch Game (everyman Chess)-Yelena Dembo Richard Palliser

In over 400 pages the authors tell the tale of the Scotch for the white pieces. In Yelena Dembo's view the Scotch is much more sound than the many gambit variations after 1. e4 e5, but at the same time leads to imbalanced middlegame positions in which black often feels less at home than in more rational lines like the Spanish. The Greek IM Dembo found e great partner in Richard Palliser; British IM and well known opening expert. The main focus of The Scotch Game lies in the two most played variations.
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Starting Out: The Scotch Game (starting Out - Everyman Chess) - John Emms
2005 Everyman Chess Starting Out: The Scotch Game (starting Out - Everyman Chess)-John Emms

According to the author of this publication the Scotch is so attractive because it can be played after little study and black doesn't have a lot of tricky sidelines. On top of that, white has the option to choose more quiet paths with the Scotch Four Knight or to enter the very tactical, complex battle of the Mieses Variation. Anyway, this book seems like an instructive way for the improving, advanced player to learn the basics (and a lot more) of this opening.
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